2012 November

Karlheinz Weinberger

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Karlheinz Weinberger- Rumy (Priska Sonderegger) 1963 ( Beehive) #throwbackthursday

RANDOM INTERNET MADNESS!

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RANDOM INTERNET MADNESS! 

So I’ve stumbled upon this picture online, and couldn’t quite believe what I was seeing!

Yes this is the NEIL MOODIE SHOE!  A shoe with pictures of  my face all over it.

Posted on a blog called ‘LeRoy’s Sugar Foot’ created by Paul LeRoy Gehres.

I’m not the only one to have the honour of my own personal glittery footwear portrait either! He’s done Orlando Pita and Vidal Sassoon amongst others.

Check the link below to see some more famous shoes from LeRoy…

leroyssugarfoot.blogspot.com

Make up by @tyron111 Pink is the new black!

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Make up by @tyron111 Pink is the new black!

What’s new here???

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What’s new here??? Something’s changed!!

WE’VE DONE IT AGAIN!!!!

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WE’VE DONE IT AGAIN!!!!

ICONIC HEADS WHICH I DESIGN WITH THE AMAZINGLY TALENTED FLORA MCLEAN FROM HOUSE OF FLORA HAS MADE IT INTO ANOTHER BOOK ABOUT HATS. ”COUTURE HATS: Sombreros De Alta Costura”

The first book they appeared in was the British Design Museum’s “50 Hats That Changed The World”  last year.

This book is by the Spanish publisher Monsa,  and has been in the making for 2 years. We’re within the company of other milliner greats including 2 British greats, Phillip Treacy and Stephen Jones so we’re very proud to be amongst that group especially Phillip and Stephen who are both Icons of Flora and myself. They are planning to publish the book in English and Japanese next year.

The book is available to view and buy from Amazon: CLICK HERE TO BUY

NEW EDITORIAL OUT THIS WEEK.

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NEW EDITORIAL OUT THIS WEEK. 

The gorgeous Doutzen Kroes shot by the legendary photographer Patrick Demarchelier, make-up by the talented new rising star of Make-up Yadim ( recently featured on my Q&A). Hair by Mr Moodie himself. Shot in Paris for Vogue Nederlands December 2012.

EDITORIAL ARCHIVE FOR THE FACE MAGAZINE SHOT BY JOHN AKEHURST.

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EDITORIAL ARCHIVE FOR THE FACE MAGAZINE SHOT BY JOHN AKEHURST.

Hot off the back of shooting his first Miu Miu campaign, photographer John Akehurst had become one of the new rising photographers of the mid 90’s.

Model Griet Troch from Belgium was also a new model on the scene that everyone was scrambling to use. Katie Grand the stylist for this editorial had contacted me prior to the shoot to say she had been inspired by an exhibition and book from the Italian born artist Vanessa Beecroft.

Beecroft’s work is very thought provoking, and is the marrying of conceptual issues with aesthetic concerns, focusing on group performance art, normally involving live female models, often nude.  Her work is executed fast and simply, with the performances being encounters between models and audience. Each performance is based on its specific location, referencing the political, historical, or social associations of the actual place. She makes video recordings and photographs of each performance, then exhibits them as documentation of the performances, but also as separate works of art.

Katie had seen some images in Vanessa’s book that inspired her and wanted to do a wig on Griet, possibly silver in colour so I went along on the day with a few wigs in my kit bag including one that was shoulder length and silver.

I imagined that Griet was going to look a little mannequin/doll ( which is how Beecroft’s subjects can often look) so I suggested that we cut the wig into a badly cut Bob, to look really wig/doll like. We all agreed on the idea and we set about for the next 2 days creating these amazing images.

There’s something a little awkward, sexy and disturbing about these images that I really like and it’s another example of how when The Face magazine existed, you could pretty much do what the bloody hell you liked without many restrictions, if any at all- the main brief being, “just create some great imagery”

I only really worked with Griet a handful of times more, in fact I’m not sure if she stuck around the fashion scene for long,  but I went on to shoot a few times with John Akehurst, of which some of those images I will post another time.

Enjoy !!

ALEXANDER RODCHENKO…..ACCORDING TO SILVS.

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ALEXANDER RODCHENKO…..ACCORDING TO SILVS.

In my late teens I used to shop in a certain record shop in my home town. I would always get served by the same guy behind the counter, who would always remark the record I was buying was a good choice, after a while he would start to recommend records for me and I’d do the same for him. Before long we were good mates, and still are now nearly 10 years later. This friend is an artist and a designer, and on first seeing his work I was amazed with what I saw. Montages, angular shapes, negative space and each piece looking very important. So on learning more about my friends influences I learnt about what are still now my favourite three art movements:

The Futurists, The DaDaists, & The Constructivists.

The latter in particular. After the Russian revolution in 1917, a group of artists decided to reflect the idea of a ‘new Russia’ within art, by abandoning traditional forms of creating art, particularly easel painting. So from this idea to re-construct art, the constructivists were born, Russian modernism.

The week I moved to London I heard that there was a large constructivist exhibition at the Tate modern, so excited as anything I went down. I remember getting lost quite a few times on the way. It turns out the exhibition had ended the day before. But not all bad, I picked up a booklet about the exhibition, to see this image on the cover:

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I hadn’t seen this image before, and there’s something about it I can look at for a long time. Even now nearly four years later I can still study this portrait. The most obvious oddity about the picture is the blanked out eye with the Russian characters in it, but there’s something about the docile look in his eye and the shaved head which give the picture a mixture of the man looking slightly not bothered, but also quite aggressive. This image is by Alexander Rodchenko, and I thought for a long time that it was a self portrait but it’s actually Osip Brik, a Russian avant garde writer and critic.

And so my love affair with Alexander Rodchenko’s work started there. When I started to look into his work, one thing that struck me was the different styles he adopted throughout his time. Many artists use different styles over the years, but the thing about Rodchenko was that you can’t always tell that two pieces would have come from the same man.

The montage work is what I found the most amazing at first:

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I loved the way the proportions are all wrong, yet the way they are carefully laid out means to me that it keeps your eye on them. Would it matter if that person there was a few inches to the right? This would have looked so alien to many people at the time, and I think these montages look like they could have been made yesterday. Although the images within are old, the way their set out always looks modern.

In 1921, Rodchenko was part of 5 artists asked to contribute to an exhibition in Moscow entitled 5×5=25. He submitted 3 canvasses, one painted yellow, one red, and one black. Obviously this is quite the pretentious statement, a painting that literally anyone could do! When asked about the work he submitted, he said ‘I reduced painting to its logical conclusion and exhibited three canvases: red, blue and yellow. I affirmed: it’s all over.‘ The death or painting is what he proclaimed, and the reason why he proclaimed this death, was the introduction of the Leica handheld portable camera.

Up until this point, cameras were always on stands and shot from waist or chest level. Having the camera in his hand meant Rodchenko could shoot at angles not seen before in photography. And it’s these photos he produced that spurred my love for photography. The way Rodchenko shot, the angles he used are what gave all Soviet photography it’s trade mark look, either shot from very low down looking up at an object, or from the top looking down. Below are a few of my favourites:

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I think due to the nature of Rodchenko always seeming to reinvent himself in the way he worked, is probably how he managed to build up such a huge body of work. I bought a book the other day based just on Rodchenko’s design and there’s so much within it that I’ve never seen, designs for Russian caramel tins and biscuit boxes!

As with so many great artists, it’s said Rodchenko wasn’t truly appreciated until after his death in 1956.

To see some more of his great photography, montage and painting, watch this short film below…

NEW EDITORIAL. Here’s this month’s i-D cover story

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NEW EDITORIAL.

Here’s this month’s i-D cover story that I worked on, and a taster of some of the pictures shot by the talented Angelo Pennetta with model of the moment Cara Delevingne. (now known as the Carantula!!- sorry, i couldn’t resist that little play on words)

Styled by accomplished stylist Cathy Kasterine, make up by the fabulous Sally Branka and nails by the ever talented Brummy manicurist Jenny Longworth!